Bill aimed at making Georgia pay for unwanted pregnancies following ‘Heartbeat Law’ passing

A bill being looked at in the 2023 Georgia legislative session would see the state paying mothers for their unwanted pregnancies that they were forced to carry
Published: Jan. 19, 2023 at 12:52 PM EST
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ATLANTA, Ga. (Atlanta News First) -A bill being looked at in the 2023 Georgia legislative session would see the state paying mothers for their unwanted pregnancies that they were forced to carry to term due to the recently enacted “Heartbeat Law.”

The cost of having and raising a child in Georgia?

“I got an estimate from the fiscal office, and they said because the number would be so hard to determine and so astronomical they actually could not give me an actual number,” said Representative Dar’Shun Kendrick, the author of HB1.

But that undetermined amount is what Representative Kendrick wants the state to pay mothers who would have had abortions but couldn’t due to the new heartbeat law that bans abortions once a fetus is six weeks.

“It requires the state of Georgia to pay all of the women’s health care, and I also would require the state to pay for childcare,” said Representative Kendrick.

The bill would also make the state pay for funeral costs for the mother or her child if they died due to complications of birth.

“So many times we hear from the other side that they are pro-family and pro-life. Well, this gives them an opportunity to do exactly that,” said Representative Kendrick.

Despite being a democrat, said Representative Kendrick believes republicans should all be in favor of her bill.

“I look forward to seeing every conservative in the state to run and sign that bill because it is doing exactly what they want, which is being pro-life and pro-family,” said Representative Kendrick.

We reached out to the authors of the heartbeat bill for a response to HB1. Representative Ed Setzler said no comment.

Republican lawmakers have recently passed bills that extend the amount of time low-income Georgia mothers can receive benefits under Medicaid and make it easier for Georgians to adopt.